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    Maceo Musicology Webcast (june '10) - Part 1

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    Mace2theO

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    Maceo Musicology Webcast (june '10) - Part 1

    Post by Mace2theO on Tue Jun 01, 2010 11:30 am

    Maceo Musicology Webcast (Maceo's Black Album) (June '10 pt 1)

    Rock Hard In A Funky Place



    I grew up in a different time...

    Maceo wrote:
    Quote 1
    The rock star named Stew doesn't have the fondest memories of growing up African-American and loving the likes of Led Zeppelin. "There were about four of us in this predominantly black school who listened to rock 'n' roll," he says. "Everyone else would tease us. It meant you were a pansy." (NY Daily News 'Rock is the new Black')

    Quote 2
    "Black rock artists have gotten past the fear that prevents many of us from fully following our interests, even when those interests aren't seen as "traditionally" black. "I grew up listening to Joy Division, New Order, Echo & the Bunnymen, the Cure…." says TV on the Radio's Kyp Malone. "I simply identified with something in the [white rock] music.” He took that music as inspiration and, along with his bandmates, created Dear Science, the sharp, angry and euphoric genre-mashing album that Rolling Stone and SPIN unanimously named their 2008 album of the year. It was also one of the blackest albums I've heard." (boldaslove blog)

    Quote 3
    And what is black rock, anyway? According to critic Greg Tate, editor of Everything But the Burden: What White People Are Taking from Black Culture, bands such as Fishbone and Living Colour emerged from the post-soul era, infusing the emotion of soul music into a more aggressive, modern-rock sound. Author Mark Anthony Neal wrote in The Birth of New Blackness, that the emergence of black rock signified "the conceiving of blackness in the absence of the black racial subject -- what happens to blackness when the need (and desire) to acknowledge the physical presence of black folk is removed." So it is not really about a black face standing in front of a all-white rock crowd, but the freedom to do so without race factoring in to the music they want to perform. And a lot of black fans and musicians play and listen to rock -- fans who are being tired of being ridiculed for attending shows because of their ethnicity and, most important, a community of thousands who want to live a punk or rock lifestyle without being unfairly judged because of the color of their skin." (boldaslove blog)

    Quote 4
    "The r&b section was always at the back of the record store. I wanted to be in the front" (P)



    This podcast is a collection of books from the some of the artists I started following in late 80's when the above really mattered to me (my Black Album so to speak). At the time, I was feeling that society was beginning to define my cultural identity around hip hop, when I listened to a broader base of music. So I reacted with rock. In hindsight, it was a dark period for me (pun intended) in that I was seeking music based on race, which defeats the purpose.

    Things are different 20 years later. More so than the success of Gnarls Barley and TV on the Radio, etc, it's the little things like the inclusion by Ymaginatif in the first Triple Threat Podcast of Alice Smith without knowing who she is that show me times are different.

    Finally, while most bloggers may disagree, I do think that P's commercial success with playing the guitar (Jimi was not a commercial success in the same way during his lifetime) indirectly led to record companies being more open to signing some of the artists featured (hence the late 80's focus)

    Anyway, feel free to ignore my ramblings and put turn the knob up to 11.

    see below


    Last edited by Mace2theO on Sun Apr 03, 2011 7:33 am; edited 2 times in total
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    purpleblues1

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    Re: Maceo Musicology Webcast (june '10) - Part 1

    Post by purpleblues1 on Tue Jun 01, 2010 12:06 pm

    Mace2theO wrote:Maceo Musicology Webcast (Maceo's Black Album) (June '10 pt 1)

    Rock Hard In A Funky Place



    I grew up in a different time...

    Maceo wrote:
    Quote 1
    The rock star named Stew doesn't have the fondest memories of growing up African-American and loving the likes of Led Zeppelin. "There were about four of us in this predominantly black school who listened to rock 'n' roll," he says. "Everyone else would tease us. It meant you were a pansy." (NY Daily News 'Rock is the new Black')

    Quote 2
    "Black rock artists have gotten past the fear that prevents many of us from fully following our interests, even when those interests aren't seen as "traditionally" black. "I grew up listening to Joy Division, New Order, Echo & the Bunnymen, the Cure…." says TV on the Radio's Kyp Malone. "I simply identified with something in the [white rock] music.” He took that music as inspiration and, along with his bandmates, created Dear Science, the sharp, angry and euphoric genre-mashing album that Rolling Stone and SPIN unanimously named their 2008 album of the year. It was also one of the blackest albums I've heard." (boldaslove blog)

    Quote 3
    And what is black rock, anyway? According to critic Greg Tate, editor of Everything But the Burden: What White People Are Taking from Black Culture, bands such as Fishbone and Living Colour emerged from the post-soul era, infusing the emotion of soul music into a more aggressive, modern-rock sound. Author Mark Anthony Neal wrote in The Birth of New Blackness, that the emergence of black rock signified "the conceiving of blackness in the absence of the black racial subject -- what happens to blackness when the need (and desire) to acknowledge the physical presence of black folk is removed." So it is not really about a black face standing in front of a all-white rock crowd, but the freedom to do so without race factoring in to the music they want to perform. And a lot of black fans and musicians play and listen to rock -- fans who are being tired of being ridiculed for attending shows because of their ethnicity and, most important, a community of thousands who want to live a punk or rock lifestyle without being unfairly judged because of the color of their skin." (boldaslove blog)

    Quote 4
    "The r&b section was always at the back of the record store. I wanted to be in the front" (P)



    This podcast is a collection of books from the some of the artists I started following in late 80's when the above really mattered to me (my Black Album so to speak). At the time, I was feeling that society was beginning to define my cultural identity around hip hop, when I listened to a broader base of music. So I reacted with rock. In hindsight, it was a dark period for me (pun intended) in that I was seeking music based on race, which defeats the purpose.

    Things are different 20 years later. More so than the success of Gnarls Barley and TV on the Radio, etc, it's the little things like the inclusion by Ymaginatif in the first Triple Threat Podcast of Alice Smith without knowing who she is that show me times are different.

    Finally, while most bloggers may disagree, I do think that P's commercial success with playing the guitar (Jimi was not a commercial success in the same way during his lifetime) indirectly led to record companies being more open to signing some of the artists featured (hence the late 80's focus)

    Anyway, feel free to ignore my ramblings and put turn the knob up to 11.


    I'm with you on that... genre busting is the way to go now...
    Back in the 80's, Dan Reed Network and Living Colour were objectified as "special" because they weren't white and working class...
    They , along with Fishbone, Roachford and the success of P proved that it doesn't matter the colour of your skin, good music is good music.
    And I was lucky enough to catch them all live at one stage or another, back in my regular gig going days.
    I was always trying to fit in - Too Rock for my soul friends, too Blues for my Metal friends, too funky for my punk friends, yet I also got to see great African, Reggae, jazz and folk bands too.
    All of which proved that diversity is a positive thing and you should never put people in boxes...
    HIp Hop went the other way, but that's another rant...
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    Ymaginatif

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    Re: Maceo Musicology Webcast (june '10) - Part 1

    Post by Ymaginatif on Tue Jun 01, 2010 3:00 pm

    I've started with this one, and one bus-ride through, I already think waw! You know so much good music!
    By now you've convinced me: I have to check out Living Colour!!!!
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    fkkScoop

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    Re: Maceo Musicology Webcast (june '10) - Part 1

    Post by fkkScoop on Wed Jun 02, 2010 3:04 am

    Ymaginatif wrote:I've started with this one, and one bus-ride through, I already think waw! You know so much good music!
    By now you've convinced me: I have to check out Living Colour!!!!

    I see some interesting articles about Living Colour on a website I´m sometimes on......let me check......wait....

    Ah, yes, it was entropy.tk or something like that!


    @Maceo:

    I really hope in here are not hidden a eighties "BESTOF" sampler..... affraid

    But let me see...
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    fkkScoop

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    Re: Maceo Musicology Webcast (june '10) - Part 1

    Post by fkkScoop on Wed Jun 02, 2010 5:29 am

    After listening to this one I´m feel like back in my own eighties/nineties....
    Put a little bit more Roachford/Mother´s Finest in and you have my Walkman-Compilation at this time.....and on the other Cassettes where almost all G´n´R!


    Like it much....but no Shoutout?

    Cry
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    Ymaginatif

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    Re: Maceo Musicology Webcast (june '10) - Part 1

    Post by Ymaginatif on Thu Jun 03, 2010 5:14 am

    The finale with the live Living Color song is AMAZING!!! I heard it yesterday on the bus, and it physically hurt to have this as the ending of the podcast!!! I wanted more more more! No ... nothing ... only the goodnight song (and a little bit of Prince Laughing )

    What a blast of a podcast!
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    Mace2theO

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    Re: Maceo Musicology Webcast (june '10) - Part 1

    Post by Mace2theO on Thu Jun 03, 2010 12:25 pm

    Glad folks are enjoying and understand where I was coming from.

    Scoop, was trying to avoid just using the usual cuts for an 80s sampler so had to use other less known songs and live stuff, so hope that worked for you (I knew you would slag me if I just put Wishing Well and Cult of Personality on there). As Mother's Finest was the decade before, they weren't included. However, they are the parents of the modern movement and I could do a whole podcast on them, and/or Living Colour. Sorry about the lack of shout out...I was back in the 80s

    PB, yeah the fitting-in thing drove so much back in the day. Unfortunately for the podcast, didn't have any rare or newer Roachford and was trying to just avoid including their hits. That sound, always loved me some "Cuddly Toy".

    Ym, I just love it when you love something!!! Glad you caught the inside joke at the end Very Happy Throw in the Mother's Finest song from the 1st podcast onto this, and we're ready for some serious air guitar displays
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    Ymaginatif

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    Re: Maceo Musicology Webcast (june '10) - Part 1

    Post by Ymaginatif on Fri Jun 04, 2010 5:33 am

    With a little help ...

    Maceo's podcast and Scoop's memory led me to the wonderful world of ...
    http://www.entropymc.com/1990s-artists-f33/corey-glover-and-living-colour-t1712.htm?highlight=living

    THANKS!
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    fkkScoop

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    Re: Maceo Musicology Webcast (june '10) - Part 1

    Post by fkkScoop on Fri Jun 04, 2010 2:14 pm

    Ymaginatif wrote:With a little help ...

    Maceo's podcast and Scoop's memory led me to the wonderful world of ...
    http://www.entropymc.com/1990s-artists-f33/corey-glover-and-living-colour-t1712.htm?highlight=living

    THANKS!


    You are welcome!
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    jaytap

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    Re: Maceo Musicology Webcast (june '10) - Part 1

    Post by jaytap on Tue Jun 08, 2010 12:41 pm

    great Maceo,

    have been looking forward to this one...

    haven't heard it yet but i too was a Living Colour man back in the day, 'elvis is dead' right? was one of their's i think, must have the cd somewhere...

    where's the link btw? or am i being a dumbo? haven't been here for a while as pleasure has been overtaken by the need to actually do some work, boo-hoo.

    jaytap.
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    Re: Maceo Musicology Webcast (june '10) - Part 1

    Post by jaytap on Tue Jun 08, 2010 12:41 pm

    cheers got it, my eyes must be going wonky.
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    Re: Maceo Musicology Webcast (june '10) - Part 1

    Post by jaytap on Fri Jul 16, 2010 2:03 pm

    going back for a second helping
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    Mace2theO

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    Mace2theO Webcast #10b - Rockhard in A Funky Place - Xtnd & EQ'd

    Post by Mace2theO on Sun Apr 03, 2011 7:11 am

    The re-issues for the webcast blog continue...

    Mace2theO Webcast #10b - Rockhard in A Funky Place - Xtnd & EQ'd




    1. Neon Messiah - Terence Trent D'Arby
    TTD was supposed to be the second coming. He was the first 'post-purple'
    artist that I followed, and based on his 1987 debut album "The
    Hardline..." with 'Wishing Well' etc, we were in for a great career.
    But then came the infamous interview with 'the Quote' - "My debut record
    was better than Sgt. Pepper's" - which killed his career (note to self:
    don't attack rock critic idols when talking to rock critics). The
    critics couldn't wait to shred his 2nd album. It took 4 years before he
    delivered two strong albums, but things had moved on. It was a shame, as
    the guy had a voice. He did learn his lesson, as he used to announce
    in his later concerts - "We can tend to be too ambitious when we're
    young, and a little blind. We can think we're the sh*t, but really we
    haven't seen the bigger picture." That could apply to a few artists I
    follow. This cut is from his 3rd album "Symphony or darn"

    2. Bless Those - Living Colour
    Wiki describes Living Colour as a "funk metal" band - funk metal?
    Anyway, the leaders of the pack are still going strong and this is from
    their 2010 release. The band were prominent members of the Black Rock
    Coalition in NYC during the late 1980s and early 1990s (a movement which
    also featured Fishbone and 24-7 Spyz). One of my favorite bands of all
    time. 'Nuff said.

    3. Freddie's Dead - Fishbone
    4. Fight The Youth - Fishbone

    Fishbone plays a fusion of ska, punk rock, and funk, and initally
    attracted a following based on their hyperactiveness, goofy sense of
    humor, and sharp social commentary. Loud Guitars, thumbing bass and a
    ska horn section. Yum. To be honest, I wasn't into Fishbone until the
    'Truth and Soul' album in '88, and it's follow up soon after. Included
    here is a track from each - a cover of Curtis Mayfield's jam and an
    original tune that shows off their ability to blend a rock riff with a
    ska-funk break & fade.

    5. Jungle Boogie - 24-7 Spyz
    Upon their formation in 1986, the band immediately earned a dedicated
    following in New York due to the eclectic mix of their music. The band
    would switch gears from Motown and soul sounds with lush vocal harmonies
    to violent heavy metal and punk with ease, sometimes several times
    within the course of one song. Here they do funk-metal justice to the
    Kool & The Gang classic. Check out the bass solo.

    6. Something Beautiful Trombone Shorty & Lenny Kravitz
    I really had high hopes for Lenny. His debut was like a breathe of
    fresh air - organic hippy funk. However, from there he became a 'rock
    star' and his music less interesting to me. But I really do like this
    track he did with New Orlean's Trombone Shorty in 2010 for TS's debut
    album.

    7. Down Low - Eric Gales

    A former child prodigy guitarist who plays a right-handed guitar
    "upside-down" (with the E-bass string on the bottom) even though he is
    not naturally left-handed (btw, not some Jimi homage but his left handed
    brother taught him to play). He was signed to Electra at 15, he plays
    the blues with in-your-face guitar riffs and in-the-pocket grooves.

    8. How I Got Over - The Family Stand
    9. This Too Will Pass - The Family Stand

    The Family Stand is a New York based rock/soul group active since the
    late 80's, consisting of Sandra St. Victor, Peter Lord, & V. Jeffrey
    Smith. They found success on the dance floor with "Ghetto Heaven" which
    allowed them to produce most of Paula Abdul's 'Spellbound' album (which
    also contained the purple song "U"). But they changed everything with
    1991's breakthough classic "Moon Over Scorpio" which tackled politics,
    social issues, relationship tensions, sexual tension, and musically
    blending the mixed influences Peter, Jeff & Sandra bought to the
    table. Sandra later work with Prince (one track ended up on
    'Emancipation'). These two cuts are from their 2010 release and show
    off their funk metal (thanks wiki) credentials. One of my favorite
    bands.

    10. Attracted To You (Live) - Terence Trent D'Arby
    A strange choice, but one of my favorite tracks from his 2nd album. "Take me to the bridge"

    11. Stuntman (Live) (Maceo remix) - 24-7 Spyz


    Here live as a power trio, this is a special remix for the podcasts. The full version might have blown your speakers.

    12. What's Your Favorite Color? (Live-Medley) - Living Colour
    Seeing this band live in NYC just blew me away. This medley has been
    released as seperate tracks on various EPs, but here it is as originally
    recorded - Ocean (Led Zep)/Sail On (Bad Brains)/What's Your Favorite
    Color? with some house music and James Brown thrown in for good measure.
    This features the original band of Corey, Vernon and Will with Muzz on
    bass.


    Now available here




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    Re: Maceo Musicology Webcast (june '10) - Part 1

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