Entropy Music Club

True Funk Soldiers


    Ways the Music Industry can save itself

    Share
    avatar
    maxim9691

    Posts : 9770
    Join date : 2008-10-14
    Age : 48
    Location : Robo Hipster

    Ways the Music Industry can save itself

    Post by maxim9691 on Thu Mar 04, 2010 11:20 am

    Auto-Tune must die !


    Auto-Tune is a proprietary audio processor created by Antares Audio Technologies. Auto-Tune uses a phase vocoder to correct pitch in vocal and instrumental performances. It is used to disguise off-key inaccuracies and mistakes, and has allowed singers to perform perfectly tuned vocal tracks without the need of singing in tune. While its main purpose is to slightly bend sung pitches to the nearest true semitone (to the exact pitch of the nearest tone in traditional equal temperament), Auto-Tune can be used as an effect to distort the human voice when pitch is raised or lowered significantly.

    Auto-Tune is available as a plug-in for professional audio multi-tracking suites used in a studio setting, and as a stand-alone, rack-mounted unit for live performance processing. Auto-Tune has become standard equipment in professional recording studios.

    Auto-Tune was initially created by Andy Hildebrand, an engineer working for Exxon. Hildebrand developed methods for interpreting seismic data, and subsequently realized that the technology could be used to detect, analyze, and modify pitch.

    Criticism

    Opponents of the plug-in argue Auto-Tune has a negative effect on society's perception and consumption of music. In 2009, Time magazine quoted an unnamed Grammy-winning recording engineer as saying, "Let's just say I've had Auto-Tune save vocals on everything from Britney Spears to Bollywood soundtrack albums. And every singer now presumes that you'll just run their voice through the box." The same article expressed "hope that pop's fetish for uniform perfect pitch will fade," speculating that pop-music songs have become harder to differentiate from one another, as "track after track has perfect pitch."[10] At the 51st Grammy Awards, the band Death Cab for Cutie made an appearance wearing blue ribbons to protest the use of Auto-Tune in the music industry.The lead single of Jay-Z's 2009 album The Blueprint 3 is titled "D.O.A. (Death of Auto-Tune)". Jay-Z elaborated that he wrote the song under the personal belief that far too many people had jumped on the Auto-Tune bandwagon and that the trend had become a gimmick

    The Anti-Auto-Tune Movement is a campaign to indicate the protest of Auto-Tune by including a symbol on the artist's album. The CD "Miss Fortune" by singer-songwriter Allison Moorer has a sticker stating that "Absolutely no vocal tuning or pitch correction was used in the making of this record". A 2003 article states that "According to industry insiders, many successful mainstream artists in most genres of music – perhaps a majority of artists – are using pitch correction". Timothy Powell, a producer/engineer interviewed for the article stated that he is "even starting to see vocal tuning devices show up in concert settings"; he states that "That's more of an ethical dilemma – people pay a premium dollar to see artists and artists want people to see them at their best." In a 2004 article, Neil McCormick called Auto-Tune a "particularly sinister invention that has been putting extra shine on pop vocals since the 1990s" by taking "a poorly sung note and transpos[ing] it, placing it dead center of where it was meant to be"-wikipedia



    [You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
    avatar
    maxim9691

    Posts : 9770
    Join date : 2008-10-14
    Age : 48
    Location : Robo Hipster

    the incredible shrinking CD

    Post by maxim9691 on Thu Mar 04, 2010 11:33 am

    It would seem that the record industry has decided that a good way to recoup lost money is to simply shrink the CD down.
    Once 45 minutes was a good length for an Album or Cassette, in a pre-CD age.
    After the CD was released and the cassette was laid to rest, the extra length of the CD was beginning to expand our content.
    Even before that the CD version contained unreleased tracks not found on record or tape and that was a big draw for me.
    When records and tapes dies so did the extra tracks on most CD's.
    It was not unusual to receive a 60 minute CD of new music and in most cases Artists like Prince filled the CD out as much as possible.

    Now forward wind to today - we stand at the edge of the boat about to make the CD walk the plank following in the footsteps of 8-tracks, cassettes and records.
    Today if we receive our must digitally or not, it is not unusual to get a new album that is a puny 35 minutes long.
    It seems the music industry is trying to recoup $ by cutting back on the content, and all this is doing is sending the CD to a quicker death and handing the reigns over to Apple's iStore.

    They had better refocus on the music before they loose more to the free digital world



    [You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
    avatar
    maxim9691

    Posts : 9770
    Join date : 2008-10-14
    Age : 48
    Location : Robo Hipster

    The RIAA needs to be disbanded

    Post by maxim9691 on Thu Mar 04, 2010 11:37 am

    Slams the $1.92 million verdict against Jammie Thomas, even calling for the RIA to be disbanded.

    Late last week we saw the closely watched retrial against accused file-sharer Jammie Thomas come to a close with the jury finding the suburban mother of two guilty and ordering her to pay some $1.92 million in damages.

    Accused of illegally “making available” 24 songs in her KaZaA shared folder, the verdict comes out to a staggering $80,000 per song! It was immediately met with widespread criticism, many observing the fact that for each of the 24 songs you could purchase 80,000 more on iTunes.

    Electonica wunderkind Moby added his voice to the discussion in a blog post on his site.

    “Arg,” he groaned. “What utter nonsense.”

    We can all agree on that one.

    “This is how the record companies want to protect themselves? Suing suburban moms for listening to music? Charging $80,000 per song?”

    In fact, the amount was so enormous that it didn’t serve as a warning to others as the RIAA hoped, or at least often claims. Instead the amount was seen as outlandish, bearing little semblance of the damage she alone could’ve been responsible for, and illustrated to the world just how desperate and out of touch the RIAA really is.

    Moby argues this “sue-em all” strategy isn’t the way to go, that the record industry’s business model shouldn’t be based on fear and intimidation of file-sharing music fans. Considering that numerous studies have concluded that P2P actually increases music consumption, suing file-sharers has a particularly negative effect on music sales.

    He furthers:

    Punishing people for listening to music is exactly the wrong way to protect the music business. Maybe the record companies have adopted the ‘it’s better to be feared than respected’ approach to dealing with music fans. I don’t know, but ‘it’s better to be feared than respected’ doesn’t seem like such a sustainable business model when it comes to consumer choice. How about a new model of ‘it’s better to be loved for helping artists make good records and giving consumers great records at reasonable prices’?

    The RIAA has spent more than 10yrs suing more than 35,000 people and has yet to reduce the number of file-sharers, or establish any meaningful, fear-based deterrence to the practice.

    In short, by any measure lawsuits have failed miserably and only seem to punish people for simply wanting to listen to music, something many musicians are glad to have happen.

    “I”m so sorry that any music fan anywhere is ever made to feel bad for making the effort to listen to music,” adds Moby.

    Now to be fair he RIAA says it quit suing new file-sharers last September, but it continues to file NEW lawsuits so actions speaker louder than words.

    Moby has an idea of what should happen to it.

    “The RIAA needs to be disbanded.”

    -zeropaid.com



    [You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
    avatar
    Inward Jim

    Posts : 177
    Join date : 2009-10-26
    Age : 37
    Location : Orlando, FL - USA

    Re: Ways the Music Industry can save itself

    Post by Inward Jim on Thu Mar 04, 2010 3:31 pm

    i will agree with the singers just assuming that auto tune will be used. I had several come through like that, and I only use it on instruments (believe it or not and usually only experimentally).
    avatar
    Ymaginatif

    Posts : 5133
    Join date : 2009-06-09
    Age : 42
    Location : imagination

    Re: Ways the Music Industry can save itself

    Post by Ymaginatif on Thu Mar 04, 2010 3:49 pm

    as far as I know I've never been auto-tuned Laughing

    I'm trying to make a feature out of my wobbly voice - so many singers get away with it, so why can't I!

    I would only use an auto-tuner to try and turn a spoken phrase from Maim's podcasts into a sung line - that would be fun lol!

    Sponsored content

    Re: Ways the Music Industry can save itself

    Post by Sponsored content


      Current date/time is Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:14 pm